Back

“Pinceladas en el Insomnio (Insomnolent Brushstrokes)” by Mexican artist Rolando Rojas on view at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

EUGENE, Ore. -- (October 31, 2012) – The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art opens “Pinceladas en el Insomnio (Insomnolent Brushstrokes),” a new exhibition by Mexican artist Rolando Rojas, on Saturday, November 17, 2012.The show of twelve oil paintings are on loan from the Consulate of Mexico in Portland and will be on display through January 13, 2013.

 

Rolando Rojas was born in the ancient city of Tehuantepec, which lies in the southern state of Oaxaca, Mexico. Tehuantepec means Cerro del Ocelote or “Hill of the Ocelot,” and its inhabitants believe they are descendants of the Záa people, who emerged from the roots of fabled trees and legendary animals. Such aspects of oral tradition figure heavily in Rojas’ work, where human figures coexist and interact with creatures of mythic origin in dreamlike landscapes of intensely saturated color. 

 

Rojas attributes the fantastic imagery that now dominates his canvases to the tales of his land and his people that populated his mind as a child. The elements of fantasy the artist first heard in stories from his grandparents and great-grandparents in Mexico are seen especially in works such as “El gigante del es bosque (The Giant of the Former Forest), where the hulking figure of the giant looms above the treetops of a barren forest. In other works, such as “Vitalidad (Vitality), a sense of eroticism is subtly suggested by the repetition of elongated and rounded forms. Though never overt, these allusions to masculinity and femininity, gender and the body, are seen often in Rojas’ paintings. 

 

Rolando Rojas received a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from the  Benito Juárez Autonomous University of  Oaxaca and a Bachelor of Arts of Restoration from the school of the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. His work has exhibited in Argentina, Japan, Italy, Spain, France, Cuba, and Canada. Rojas was chosen for an individual travelling exhibition by the Foreign Ministry of Mexico and the show traveled to Brazil, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Panama, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, Chile, and Nicaragua from 2008 to 2010.

 

“Rolando Rojas: Insomnolent Brushstrokes” is organized by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon, Eugene. The exhibition is made possible by a grant from the Oregon Cultural Trust and the generous support of the Consulate of Mexico in Portland, the UO Latin American Studies Program, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

 

 

About the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is a premier Pacific Northwest museum for exhibitions and collections of historic and contemporary art based in a major university setting. The mission of the museum is to enhance the University of Oregon’s academic mission and to further the appreciation and enjoyment of the visual arts for the general public.  The JSMA features significant collections galleries devoted to art from China, Japan, Korea, America and elsewhere as well as changing special exhibition galleries.  The JSMA is one of six museums in Oregon accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.

 

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is located on the University of Oregon campus at 1430 Johnson Lane. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Sundays. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for senior citizens. Free admission is given to ages 18 and under, JSMA members, college students with ID, and University of Oregon faculty, staff and students. For information, contact the JSMA, 541-346-3027.

 

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

 

Contact: Debbie Williamson Smith, 541-346-0942, debbiews@uoregon.edu

 

Link: Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, http://jsma.uoregon.edu

”Art and Language” is the theme for the new season of Schnitzer Cinema

EUGENE, Ore. -- (September 18, 2012) – “Art and Language” is the theme of this season’s Schnitzer Cinema series, complementing the exhibitions “Lesley Dill’s Poetic Visions: From Shimmer to Sister Gertrude Morgan” and “Good Grief! A Selection of Original Art from 50 Years of Charles M. Schulz’s PEANUTS.” Cosponsored with the Cinema Pacific film festival, Schnitzer Cinema is the JSMA's monthly showcase for adventurous cinema, featuring screenings and live Skype dialogues with special guests.  Schnitzer Cinema screenings, on the second Wednesday of each month at 7:00 p.m., are free and include free popcorn and soda.

 

The season opens with a screening of ““Beauty is Embarrassing” on Wednesday, October 10 at 7 p.m. The film screening will be followed by a live Skype interview with artist Wayne White.  Admission is free.

 

“The museum’s exhibitions this season inspired me to select new films that highlight ‘art and language,’ from the word paintings of artist Wayne White in ‘Beauty is Embarrassing” to the Beat poetry of Diane DiPrima in ‘The Poetry Deal,’ ” says Richard Herskowitz, series curator and director of Cinema Pacific.

           
Part biography, part live performance, “Beauty Is Embarrassing” is a funny, irreverent, and inspiring documentary on artist Wayne White, a designer, painter, puppeteer, sculptor, and musician. The film traces White’s career from his start as an underground cartoonist in New York’s East Village to his big break as a designer, puppeteer and voice-over actor on “Pee-wee’s Playhouse,” for which he won three Emmy’s.  It follows Wayne’s success designing and animating for other children’s shows like “Beakman’s World” and music videos for The Smashing Pumpkins (“Tonight, Tonight”) and Peter Gabriel (“Big Time”) through a dark period of struggle and self-reflection before emerging in his present-day incarnation as a respected painter and performer.  Director Neil Berkeley discovered hours of video which White shot throughout his career including never-before-seen behind the scenes footage of the making of “Pee-wee’s Playhouse,” now included in the film. The film, like White, embraces the ragged edges and messy contradictions of life, art, and family with biting humor and honesty.

 

The season continues with a screening of “The Connection” featuring a Skype dialogue with film preservationist Dennis Doros on November 14. “The Connection,” the first feature film, by Shirley Clarke, takes on a controversial play by Jack Gelber that was running off-Broadway, performed by the Living Theatre. It was a play within a play within a jazz concert. It portrayed a group of drug addicts, some of them jazz musicians, waiting in a New York loft apartment for their drug connection. A producer and a writer, meanwhile, have entered their lives to study them and write a play about them. The brilliantly written Beat dialogue was blended with jazz music written and performed by the great pianist Freddie Redd.

 

On December 7, the season closes honoring the 40th anniversary of film distributor Women Make Movies, and features two of their latest releases, both addressing the work of courageous poets. “Poetry of Resilience” is a documentary by Academy Award-nominated director Katja Esson about six international poets who individually survived Hiroshima, the Holocaust, China’s Cultural Revolution, the Kurdish Genocide in Iraq, the Rwandan Genocide, and the Iranian Revolution. “The Poetry Deal: A Film with Diane di Prima” is an impressionistic document on the great Beat poet. The screening includes a Skype dialogue with Women Make Movies executive director Debra Zimmerman

 

All films will be screened in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art Ford Lecture Hall. Schnitzer Cinema is brought to you in partnership with Cinema Pacific and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

 

 

About the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is a premier Pacific Northwest museum for exhibitions and collections of historic and contemporary art based in a major university setting. The mission of the museum is to enhance the University of Oregon’s academic mission and to further the appreciation and enjoyment of the visual arts for the general public.  The JSMA features significant collections galleries devoted to art from China, Japan, Korea, America and elsewhere as well as changing special exhibition galleries.  The JSMA is one of six museums in Oregon accredited by the American Association of Museums.

 

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is located on the University of Oregon campus at 1430 Johnson Lane. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Sundays. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for senior citizens. Free admission is given to ages 18 and under, JSMA members, college students with ID, and University of Oregon faculty, staff and students. For information, contact the JSMA, 541-346-3027.

 

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

 

Contact: Debbie Williamson Smith, 541-346-0942, debbiews@uoregon.edu

 

Link: Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, http://jsma.uoregon.edu

            Cinema Pacific, http://cinemapacific.uoregon.edu/

Renoir, de Chirico and Moore works go on view as part of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art’s Masterworks on Loan program

EUGENE, Ore. -- (September 14, 2012) – Works by Giorgio de Chirico, Paul Delvaux, Anne-Louis Girodet de Roucy-Trioson, Henry Moore, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir,  are now on view in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art’s Focus Gallery as part of the Masterworks on Loan program. The works will be on view September 18 through December 30, 2012. 

 

“This is an exciting opportunity for the JSMA to have masterworks on view to share with our visitors and enhance the curriculum at the University of Oregon,” says Jill Hartz, executive director. “We are deeply grateful to the art collectors who loan us these works, which truly strengthen our teaching mission.”

 

Italian Surrealist painter Giorgio de Chirico (1888–1978) was born in Greece and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich, Germany, before moving to Florence, Italy, in 1910. His metaphysical period, which spanned 1909-19, focused on mysterious environments and sharp contrasts of light and shadow. These early works made a profound impact on the French Surrealist painters, but de Chirico broke ties with the group in the mid-1920s over differing opinions on modern art. After 1919, he became more interested in the work of Italian Renaissance masters Raphael (1483–1520) and Luca Signorelli (1445–1523).

 

“Ettore e Andromaca (Hector and Andromaca,” an early oil on canvas by de Chirico, features the tragic couple Hector and Andromaca from Homer’s epic “The Iliad.” For de Chirico, the story of the doomed Trojan leader and his wife resonated with his own views on modern warfare in the wake of the First World War. He explored this topic in several media, including bronze sculpture, over many decades, but it was this painting that Alfred H. Barr, Jr., then the director of the Museum of Modern Art, considered “by far the most powerful of all Chirico’s versions of this theme.”

 

The monumental nudes in Paul Devaux’s “Jeunes Filles à la Campagne (Young Girls in the Country),” reference classical forms in a contemporary outdoor setting and was painted in 1929.   Delvaux studied music, Greek, and Latin in his youth and then took classes in architecture and decorative painting at the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels. By the time of his first one-man exhibition in 1925, he had completed over eighty paintings of naturalistic landscapes. In the following years, he introduced nude female forms into his pastoral scenes. Delvaux, who had been deeply influenced by early Italian Renaissance painting at the beginning of his career, had a transformative experience when he discovered the work of painter Georgio de Chirico (1888–1978) in a Parisian gallery in 1927. The Italian artist’s eerie atmospheres and classicized figures were of particular interest to Delvaux, who began to incorporate subversive juxtapositions into his own work.

 

Anne-Louis Girodet de Roucy-Trioson studied under French Neoclassical master Jacques-Louis David (1746–1825). He was awarded the Prix de Rome, Europe’s most prestigious art scholarship, in 1789, while spending four years in Italy. Unlike his mentor, Girodet painted with a heightened sense of emotion and eroticism, elements that characterized the art movement known as Romanticism. In “La Belle Elisabeth,” the sitter’s identity is unknown, and it is unclear whether this work was a commissioned portrait or a study for an allegorical subject. However, the “Elizabeth” of this portrait bears a strong resemblance to the dark-haired woman in Girodet’s studies for his most famous painting, “Pygmalion and Galatea” (in the final version of which the artist depicted Galatea as a blonde), completed in 1819.

 

“Mother and Child with Apple,” a bronze sculpture by British artist Henry Moore, depicts one of the artists favorite motifs. Though this imagery obviously references maternity, it can also be interpreted as a representation of artistic creativity. Moore considered the image of a mother and child to be universal, and he claimed to have recognized it in “every little scribble, blot or smudge.” Moore enrolled in the Leeds School of Art in 1919, after service in the British army during World War I, and, two years later, was awarded a scholarship to continue his art education at London’s Royal College of Art (where he would later hold a seven-year teaching appointment). Although his earliest sculptures were fastidiously planned and showed the influence of classicism and Victorian romanticism, Moore became interested in the act of direct carving. The resulting sculptures appear to have been shaped by the elements and usually retained imperfections and artist’s marks on their surfaces. He is best known for his large carved marble and cast bronze sculptures that have been installed in public spaces.

 

Two oil on canvas works, “Buste de Femme Nue (Bust of Nude Woman),” 1879 and “Portrait de Femme au Bandeau Vert (Portrait of a Woman with a Green Headband),” 1905, but French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir are included in the Masterworks on Loan installation. “Buste de Femme Nu” predates Renoir’s trip to Italy in 1881, after which he showed even greater interest in painting female nudes. The late work “Portrait de Femme au Bandeau Vert,” with the sitter’s expressive pose and the broadly painted, neutral background, is typical of Renoir’s mature style.

 

Born in the city of Limoges, France, Pierre-Auguste Renoir grew up in a working-class family in Paris and, as a teenager, apprenticed in a porcelain factory. As was common practice for aspiring painters, Renoir registered to paint copies of masterworks in the collection of the Louvre Museum. He received his formal education at the École des Beaux-Arts and in the studio of Swiss painter Charles Gleyre (1806–74), who also taught Claude Monet (1840–1926) and Alfred Sisley (1839–99). Renoir’s broken brushwork, vibrant, light-infused colors, and cheerful scenes of leisure activities made him one of the leading figures in the birth of Impressionism. He was especially adept at portraiture and was celebrated for his sensual representations of women.

 

By the mid-1880s was pursuing a more individual style influenced by classicism. For the next two decades he frequently reevaluated his aims as an artist, in part due to his opportunities for travel throughout Europe to study the work of the Old Masters. He greatly admired the colorful, fleshy nudes painted by Titian (Italian, ca. 1488–1576), Raphael (Italian, 1483–1520), Rubens (Flemish, 1577–1640), and Velazquez (Spanish, 1599–1660). Domestic scenes, nudes, and portraits of women, which were usually painted in the studio instead of en plein air like his Impressionist body of work, dominated his output at the end of his career. By the time of his death at age seventy-eight, Renoir’s paintings numbered in the thousands.

 

 

About the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is a premier Pacific Northwest museum for exhibitions and collections of historic and contemporary art based in a major university setting. The mission of the museum is to enhance the University of Oregon’s academic mission and to further the appreciation and enjoyment of the visual arts for the general public.  The JSMA features significant collections galleries devoted to art from China, Japan, Korea, America and elsewhere as well as changing special exhibition galleries.  The JSMA is one of six museums in Oregon accredited by the American Association of Museums.

 

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is located on the University of Oregon campus at 1430 Johnson Lane. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Sundays. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for senior citizens. Free admission is given to ages 18 and under, JSMA members, college students with ID, and University of Oregon faculty, staff and students. For information, contact the JSMA, 541-346-3027.

 

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

 

Contact: Debbie Williamson Smith, 541-346-0942, debbiews@uoregon.edu

 

Link: Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, http://jsma.uoregon.edu

Contemporary Artist Lesley Dill’s “Poetic Visions” opens at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

EUGENE, Ore. -- (August 29, 2012) – The special exhibition “Lesley Dill’s Poetic Visions: From Shimmer to Sister Gertrude Morgan” opens at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art on the University of Oregon campus on September 29 and will be on view through December 9, 2012.

 

An array of programs complement “Poetic Visions,” including an artist talk by Dill on Thursday, September 27, at 6 p.m. in 177 Lawrence Hall and a free, public opening at the JSMA on Friday, September 28, from 6 – 8 p.m.

 

Lesley Dill is one of the most prominent contemporary American artists working at the intersection of language and fine art.  Experimenting with a wide range of tactile materials, she fuses poetic text and images to create evocative, mixed-media artworks and performances. Inspired by her two-year sojourn in India and the illuminating aspects of diverse faith traditions, Dill interprets relationships between the physical and the spiritual.  Her expressive artworks, layered with multiple meanings, also reference nature and human identity.

 

This exhibition features two bodies of the artist’s work. “HELL HELL HELL/HEAVEN HEAVEN HEAVEN: Encountering Sister Gertrude Morgan and Revelation” is inspired by the life of an influential New Orleans missionary, artist, and musician. Dill connected with Morgan’s artistry, particularly her integration of text and image, and her strength as a leader and woman of firm convictions. The artist conceives of her installation as a theatrical stage set. Two lavish gowns represent stages of the missionary’s life: before and after she became the “bride of Christ.” The dresses are surrounded by heroically scaled drawings that reflect Morgan’s frenetic, passionate preaching style and text by Morgan as well as one of Dill’s favorite poets, Emily Dickinson.

 

The second body of work features “Shimmer,” a 60 foot “curtain” composed of 2,190,000 feet of fine wire that forms a silvery cascade, suggesting the dazzling reflections of light off the Atlantic Ocean. This waterfall-like wall piece descends from a fragment of a mystical poem by the Catalan poet Salvador Espriu.  Also, shown as part of this installation are five “Allegorical Figures.”  Costumed in glistening metal foil, organza, and wire, “each figure presents an existential conundrum,” according to the artist. Referencing the elements as well as mythological figures in art history, they carry language that situates the viewer in the present and invites deeper interpretation.

 

“Lesley Dill is an artist alchemist,” says JSMA executive director Jill Hartz. “She aims to create an environment within the gallery in which visitors encounter or connect with a spiritual self or place through a very specifically created form and selection of words.  Paradoxically, she uses language to go beyond language, form to find formlessness. And she does it with powerfully beautiful artworks.”

 

Lesley Dill was born in Bronxville, New York, and raised in Maine. After graduating from Trinity College with a degree in English, she received her master of arts in teaching from Smith College in 1974, and her master of fine arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1980. The artist soon moved to New York, where she emerged prominently as a sculptor and multi-media artist. Dill has also made significant contributions as a performance artist, and aspects of theater inform the pieces exhibited in this exhibition. Nationally recognized, Dill has shown her work in numerous solo exhibitions across the country. Her artworks are in the collections of over fifty museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. The artist lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She is represented by the Arthur Rogers Gallery in New Orleans and the George Adams Gallery in New York City.

 

The exhibition is organized by Barbara Matilsky, curator, Whatcom Museum, Washington, and made possible at the JSMA by the Coeta and Donald Barker Changing Exhibitions Endowment Fund and JSMA members.

 

Programs

 

Artist’s Talk

Thursday, September 27, 6 p.m.

177 Lawrence Hall

Cosponsored by the UO Department of Art

 

Opening Reception

Friday, September 28, 6–8 p.m.

 

Panel: Poetic Visions

Wednesday, October 17, 5:30 p.m.

Deb Casey (poet); Maggie Evans, doctoral candidate in English; and Tres Pyle, Associate Professor of English, moderated by Karen J. Ford, Professor of English,  look at Lesley Dill’s work through the lens of poetry. Cosponsored by the Department of Comparative Literature and the Department of English

 

Panel: Religious Visions

Wednesday, October 24, 5:30 p.m.

Lisa Freinkel, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature; Daniel Falk, Associate Professor of Religious Studies; and Mark Unno, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, explore Dill's art through the lens of world religions. Cosponsored by the Department of Religious Studies

w

TARDIS Ensemble Concert: Poetic Visions

Sunday, October 28, 2 p.m.

This chamber music collective, founded in 2011, engages audiences through thematic programs that explore distinct time periods, countries, or genres: Sophia Tegart, flute; Catherine Lee, oboe; Helena Spencer, bassoon; Casey Bozell and Holland Phillips, violins; Clark Spencer, viola; and Valdine Ritchie Mishkin, cello. Baritone soloist Aaron Cain joins the Ensemble in a program inspired by Dill’s interactions with poetry and multimedia.  Cosponsored by the Department of Religious Studies

 

Word Play Family Day

Saturday, December 1, 11 a.m.–3 p.m.

Celebrate the holiday season at the art museum! Come explore the world of comics and art inspired by writing. Art activities for kids of all ages include projects based on the work of contemporary artist Lesley Dill, PEANUTS’ Charles Schulz, and guest artist Jan Eliot, creator of “Stone Soup.” Be sure to take time to make your own shadow puppet. Light refreshments and holiday entertainment will also be a part of this magical day. Cosponsored by the Confucius Institute

 

 

About the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is a premier Pacific Northwest museum for exhibitions and collections of historic and contemporary art based in a major university setting. The mission of the museum is to enhance the University of Oregon’s academic mission and to further the appreciation and enjoyment of the visual arts for the general public.  The JSMA features significant collections galleries devoted to art from China, Japan, Korea, America and elsewhere as well as changing special exhibition galleries.  The JSMA is one of six museums in Oregon accredited by the American Association of Museums.

 

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is located on the University of Oregon campus at 1430 Johnson Lane. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Sundays. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for senior citizens. Free admission is given to ages 18 and under, JSMA members, college students with ID, and University of Oregon faculty, staff and students. For information, contact the JSMA, 541-346-3027.

 

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

 

Contact: Debbie Williamson Smith, 541-346-0942, debbiews@uoregon.edu

 

Link: Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, http://jsma.uoregon.edu

”Good Grief! A Selection of Original Art from Fifty Years of Charles M. Schulz’s PEANUTS on view at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The exhibition, curated by Ben Saunders, features five strips from each decade

EUGENE, Ore. -- (August 20, 2012) – “GOOD GRIEF! A Selection of Original Art from 50 Years of Charles M. Schulz's PEANUTS” goes on view in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art’s Artist Project Space from September 1 to December 30, 2012. The exhibition features twenty-five examples from Schulz’s lifetime of work, with five strips for each decade.

 

“PEANUTS” ran for fifty years, debuting on October 2, 1950, and running until February 13, 2000.  Schulz took only one extended holiday during that entire period (for one month, in the winter of 1997).  Otherwise, he worked consistently on the comic until his death, passing away just a day before the last episode saw print.  In total, he produced an astonishing 17, 897 PEANUTS strips.

 

“In selecting just twenty-five examples from this lifetime’s work, the sin of omission is unavoidable,” says exhibition curator Ben Saunders, associate professor of English and director of the new Comics Studies minor at the University of Oregon. In 2009 Saunders curated the exhibition “Faster Than a Speeding Bullet: The Art of the Superhero” at the JSMA.  “Instead of pretending to an impossible comprehensiveness,” he continues, “we offer a series of revealing snapshots spanning the five decades of “PEANUTSto produce a kind of “’time-lapse‘ effect ¾ allowing the viewer to take in the origins, maturation, and final years of the strip in a slow tour of the gallery.”

 

Saunders adds that today, Charlie Brown is immediately recognizable as an archetype of pop-existentialism. He is a loser-everyman, a cartoon representation of perennial human disappointment; but even at his most desperate, he has somehow never lost the capacity to make us laugh.  His canine companion, Snoopy, by contrast, can be reads as an emblem of imaginative vitality ¾ compelling our attention with his exuberant flights of fantasy. 

 

The iconic characters from “PEANUTS” did not spring from Schulz’s pen fully realized. They took shape gradually, over years of disciplined, daily creative exercise, and address the social and cultural changes of the period.  For example, the selections on view reflect this tumultuous historical period, and sometimes Schulz’s personal values, with subtle invocations of the Civil Rights struggle, Women’s Liberation, an increasingly litigious society, and the fragility of the natural world.  

 

“Although necessarily incomplete, we believe this selection proves one thing,” says Saunders. “Charles Schulz’s ‘PEANUTS‘ is not merely the most successful newspaper comic strip in the history of the medium.  It is also a modern American masterpiece.”

 

Public activities related to the exhibition include the following two programs:

A Conversation with Jan Eliot on Tuesday, October 23, at 5:30 p.m. Exhibition curator Ben Saunders interviews Jan Eliot about her experiences with Charles Schulz and her own career as the artist of the nationally successful newspaper strip “Stone Soup.”

 

On Thursday, November 8, at 5:30 p.m., Gary Groth, publisher of Fantagraphics Books and “The Complete Peanuts” and past editor-in-chief of “The Comics Journal,” speaks on the importance of Charles Schulz’s work within the larger tradition of newspaper strip comics. This lecture is co-sponsored by the UO School of Journalism.

 

 “Good Grief” is made possible with funding from the JSMA Academic Support Grant Program, the Coleman-Guitteau OHC Fellowship, and with the help and support of Jean Schulz and the staff of The Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center in Santa Rosa, CA.

 

About the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is a premier Pacific Northwest museum for exhibitions and collections of historic and contemporary art based in a major university setting. The mission of the museum is to enhance the University of Oregon’s academic mission and to further the appreciation and enjoyment of the visual arts for the general public.  The JSMA features significant collections galleries devoted to art from China, Japan, Korea, America and elsewhere as well as changing special exhibition galleries.  The JSMA is one of six museums in Oregon accredited by the American Association of Museums.

 

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is located on the University of Oregon campus at 1430 Johnson Lane. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Sundays. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for senior citizens. Free admission is given to ages 18 and under, JSMA members, college students with ID, and University of Oregon faculty, staff and students. For information, contact the JSMA, 541-346-3027.

 

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

 

Contact: Debbie Williamson Smith, 541-346-0942, debbiews@uoregon.edu

Link: Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, http://jsma.uoregon.edu

 

 

 

 

Recently restored film “The Connection” featured at Schnitzer Cinema

 

The film screening will be followed by a Skype interview with film preservationist Dennis Doro

 

EUGENE, Ore. -- (November 6, 2012) – Schnitzer Cinema features the recently restored 1961 film “The Connection” on Wednesday, November 14, at 7:00 p.m., followed by a Skype dialogue with film preservationist Dennis Doros from Milestone Films. Admission is free and includes free popcorn and soda.

 

“The Connection,” the first feature film by Shirley Clarke, takes on a controversial play by Jack Gelber that was running off-Broadway, performed by the Living Theatre. It was a play within a play within a jazz concert. It portrayed a group of drug addicts, some of them jazz musicians, waiting in a New York loft apartment for their drug connection. A theater director and a writer, meanwhile, have entered their lives to study them and write a play about them. The brilliantly written Beat dialogue was blended with jazz music, written and performed by the great pianist and composer Freddie Redd.

 

In her film version of the play, Clarke made the observer a cinema verite filmmaker. To further the illusion of reality, the filmmakers intentionally left in artifacts of filmmaking — film rolls suddenly end in black leader; sound sync beeps are heard, and light flairs, dust, scratches and out-of-focus moments are preserved. This roughness led many critics to assume that the film was improvised. However, like the camera movement and the choreography of the actors, Clarke carefully planned everything in “The Connection.”

 

The film was highly controversial upon its release. While it won the International Critics Award at Cannes, its language and drug use got it censored by the New York Board of Regents, and banned from theaters. The ban was ultimately overturned by the New York State Supreme Court.

 

Shirley Clarke was a leader and major filmmaker in the New York film community in the 1950s and 1960s. Her films helped launch the American independent feature film movement, and are among its best creations.  Originally a choreographer, Clarke studied filmmaking with Hans Richter at the City College of New York and participated in informal filmmaking classes with director and cinematographer Peter Glushanok.  She filmed several short dance films , and then applied her choreographer's skills to the rhythmic editing of her semi-documentaries “Bridges Go Round” (1959) and the Academy Award-nominated “Skyscraper” (1959). After “The  Connection,” her 1962 documentary “Robert Frost: A Lover's Quarrel,” won the Academy Award for Best Documentary. Her next feature, “The Cool World,” explored life in Harlem and was followed by “Portrait of Jason,” in 1967, a two-hour interview with a black male prostitute.  In the final years of her career, Clarke taught film courses at UCLA. Following a protracted illness Clarke died in Boston on September 23, 1997 at age 78.

 

“The Connection” is the first release in Milestone Films ambitious “Project Shirley.” Milestone has acquired the rights to four of Clarke's features and more than a dozen of her short films. The company is working with the archives to release restored versions of Clarke’s work, and “The Connection,” the first to be done, was preserved by the UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding from The Film Foundation from the original 35mm acetate picture and soundtrack negatives and a 35 mm composite master positive.

 

“Art and Language” is the theme of the Fall 2012 Schnitzer Cinema series, complementing current exhibitions Lesley Dill’s “Poetic Visions: From Shimmer to Sister Gertrude Morgan” and “Good Grief! A Selection of Original Art from 50 Years of Charles M Schulz’s PEANUTS.” Schnitzer Cinema is brought to you in partnership with Cinema Pacific and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

 

 

About the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is a premier Pacific Northwest museum for exhibitions and collections of historic and contemporary art based in a major university setting. The mission of the museum is to enhance the University of Oregon’s academic mission and to further the appreciation and enjoyment of the visual arts for the general public.  The JSMA features significant collections galleries devoted to art from China, Japan, Korea, America and elsewhere as well as changing special exhibition galleries.  The JSMA is one of six museums in Oregon accredited by the American Association of Museums.

 

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is located on the University of Oregon campus at 1430 Johnson Lane. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Sundays. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for senior citizens. Free admission is given to ages 18 and under, JSMA members, college students with ID, and University of Oregon faculty, staff and students. For information, contact the JSMA, 541-346-3027.

 

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

 

Contact: Debbie Williamson Smith, 541-346-0942, debbiews@uoregon.edu

 

Link: Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, http://jsma.uoregon.edu

            Cinema Pacific, http://cinemapacific.uoregon.edu/

JACK FULTON, Zomeworks Bus (1973), 2011, Chromogenic print, 21 x 14 4/5 in, Courtesy the artist

ROGER ARVID ANDERSON, Johnny, 1972, Archival pigment print, 18 x 27 in, Courtesy the artist

West of Center: Art and the Counterculture Experiment in America, 1965-1977

February 09, 2013 to April 28, 2013

In the heady and hallucinogenic days of the 1960s and ’70s, a diverse range of artists and creative individuals based in the American West – from the Pacific coast to the Rocky Mountains and the Southwest – broke the barriers between art and lifestyle and embraced the new, hybrid sensibilities of the countercultural movement. West of Center explores their unique integration of art practices, political action, and collaborative life activities. Featuring videos, photographs, drawings, ephemera and other artifacts, the exhibition relates an exciting story of collaboration, indeterminate processes, an emphasis on experience - all exploring the various ways in which art was integral to countercultural efforts to instigate personal growth and social transformation, everywhere visible in contemporary art practice.

Key components of the exhibition include:

• Video presentation of expanded cinema, featuring the multi-media light show The Single Wing Turquoise Bird;

• Recreation of the tondo The Ultimate Painting, created by the communards of Drop City, once exhibited at Robert Rauschenberg’s Experiments in Art  and Technology (EAT) at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, now lost;

• Dome and video environment presenting the hand-built architecture of Drop City commune, in Colorado, including historical film footage;

• Video and photographic documentation of the improvisational, task-oriented dance of Anna Halprin;

• Video and photographic documentation of performances by The Cockettes and The Angels of Light as well as costumes and other artifacts;

• Videos, photographs, ephemera and other documentation of the collective Ant Farm, including inflatable;

• Ephemera from Lesbian Feminist Communes in Southern Oregon.

West of Center: Art and the Counterculture Experiment in America, 1965-1977 is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver. The exhibition is supported, in part, with funds provided by the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF) and the National Endowment for the Arts. It is made possible at the JSMA by the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Endowment Fund and JSMA members. This project is supported in part by a grant from the Oregon Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

West of Center Programs

Pages

Subscribe to Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art RSS