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Conversations in the Round House: Roots, Roads, and Remembrances

September 09, 2017 to February 11, 2018

This academic year, all UO first-year students received Louise Erdrich’s novel The Round House; faculty are using the book in courses across campus for undergraduate and graduate students. Last year, more than sixty classes used the museum’s first exhibition organized specifically to support the “Common Reading.” Based on the success of Between the World and Me: African American Artists Respond to Ta-Nehisi Coates, the JSMA plans to present a “Common Seeing” exhibition each year -- where students can expand their dialogues and investigations in front of works of art.

This year’s companion exhibition, Conversations in the Round House: Roots, Roads and Remembrances, features twenty-four contemporary works by twelve artists who affirm their ties to Native culture: Rick Bartow, Ka’ila Farrell-Smith, Joe Feddersen, James Lavadour, Tanis Matthews, P.Y. Minthorn, Lillian Pitt, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Wendy Red Star, Gail Tremblay, Marie Watt, and Elizabeth Woody.  The majority of the objects come from the JSMA’s collection, and some works, like James Lavadour’s painting Torch, are recent acquisitions on exhibition for the first time here. We are also grateful to the artists and private collectors who lent their important works.

The exhibition addresses central concerns in Erdrich’s novel—community and identity, landscape and a sense of place, and history, memory and storytelling, as well as violence to women, sovereignty, justice, and racism. The novel begins with the rape of the narrator’s mother, which starts the adolescent son on a journey that makes him question social mores, sacred rituals, and his place on the reservation and in the larger world. Likewise, the works in the exhibition explore the diverse ways artists approach cultural heritage, freedom and colonization, and the uneasy coexistence of natural, material and spiritual worlds.

Conversations in the Round House: Roots, Roads and Ritual is co-curated by Danielle Knapp, McCosh Associate Curator, and Cheryl Hartup, Associate Curator of Academic Programs and Latin American Art with Beth Robinson-Hartpence (Lenni Lenape), JSMA art preparator-conservator, who advised on the project.

Download the JSMA Visitor Guide for Conversations in the Round House: Roots, Roads and Ritual.

Mark Clarke and Margaret Coe: Our Lives in Paint

October 21, 2017 to April 01, 2018

This retrospective exhibition will celebrate the half-century relationship of Eugene painters Margaret Coe and Mark Clarke (who passed away unexpectedly on January 11, 2016). Clarke was beloved for his luminescent acrylic paintings that captured the Willamette Valley’s unique landscape and atmosphere, but he also painted striking figures drawn from imagination, memory, and his own family. He extended his interest in harmonious color and form beyond the canvas through explorations in sculpture and collage. Coe, who recognizes modernist Oregon painters C.S. Price (1874–1950) and Charles Heaney (1897–1981) as important influences, has a keen eye for the dynamic color and energy of this region. Her brightly-realized paintings of the Northwest treat the natural and the manmade with equal attention. Additionally, she has engaged with cross-cultural, international subject matter (painting on site during artist residencies in England, France, and Italy), as well as acutely-personal moments from periods of grief and mourning.  Clarke graduated from the UO with a B.S. in 1959 and an M.F.A. in 1965. He was previously the chief museum exhibitions preparator and museum technician at the University of Oregon Museum of Art (now the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art). Coe received her M.F.A. from the UO in 1978 and later taught at the UO, Lane Community College, and the Maude Kerns Art Center. Between the two of them, Clarke and Coe studied under many of the finest artists on the UO teaching staff:  painters David McCosh (1903–81), Andrew Vincent (1898–1993), and Frank Okada (1931–2000), and sculptor Jan Zach (1914–86).

The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with essays by Danielle Knapp, Margaret Coe, and Roger Saydack, made possible by a Ford Family Foundation Exhibition Documentation and Support Grant.

 

Keith Achepohl: Vision of Nature/Vessel of Beauty

January 20, 2018 to April 29, 2018

In 2011, Eugene-based artist Keith Achepohl (American, born 1934) spent three weeks at the Morris Graves Foundation Artist Residency, “The Lake,” in Loleta, California. That period of uninterrupted work, followed by a second stay in 2016, profoundly affected both the artist’s subject matter and his media. Thus far, Achepohl has created nine distinct yet interrelated explorations of the plants and trees that he observed at Morris Graves's final home, which are presented here for the first time.  Although the finished pieces are wholly of nature, they are, according to the artist, neither landscapes nor botanical studies. Rather, he describes them as “more fantasy than reality, an intensely personal language of nature that developed from careful observation to mnemonic response.” Achepohl’s virtuosity across media is evident in these sensitively rendered, metaphorically rich portraits of The Lake’s natural splendor.

In his artist’s statement about this body of work, Achepohl wrote:

It was easy to concentrate on a group of plants and begin witnessing the cycle from a young green stem growing into a robust maturity, finally transitioning into its final stage as its sleek lines shriveled and achieved a proud baroque character. A single tree could be observed many times, revealing a different landscape in the intricacies of its bark and branches at each perspective. The Lake provided an endless course of material to mentally record what I could record at the moment, and to this day those visions have generated mnemonic responses as significant as the initial encounters. What was seen then and later recalled has dictated the direction and materials used in the creation of the images presented here. Watercolor, pencil drawings, oil paint on raw linen, acrylic and collage paintings.  I have never thought of what I work on as “landscape” pictures. The plants and trees that have come into my life have always been living entities. Part of life, part of time.

Keith Achepohl received a B.A. from Knox College (1956), an M.F.A. from the University of Iowa (1960), and honorary doctorates from Pacific Lutheran University (1989) and Knox College (1996). He served as head of printmaking at the School of Art at the University of Iowa and director of the University of Iowa Summer in Venice. Among his numerous awards and recognitions are Fulbright grants in Egypt (1977) and Turkey (1984) and a National Endowment for the Arts grant (1994). Achepohl has exhibited extensively nationally and internationally.  His works are held in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C.; the Biblioteca Nacional in Madrid, Spain; the Kobe Art Museum in Japan; the Art Institute of Chicago, the Brooklyn Museum;  the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Whitney Museum of American Art; and many others.

Keith Achepohl: Vision of Nature/Vessel of Beauty was curated by Danielle Knapp, McCosh Associate Curator, and Jill Hartz, Executive Director. The exhibition and its fully illustrated catalog are made possible with the generous support of the Coeta and Donald Barker Changing Exhibitions Endowment; the Harold and Arlene Schnitzer CARE Foundation; the Oregon Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; Philip and Sandra Piele; Diana Gardener; and JSMA members.

Tracing Memories Workshop

Join us for Tracing Memories, an art workshop that promotes stress reduction and relaxation through coloring line art of photographs. Work at your own pace to bring your artwork to life. Demonstration and guidance will be given using Copic Markers. You may bring in your own photograph to convert to line art with our app or practice coloring on the images that are provided. Workshop is free.

Sponsored by Imagination International, Inc.

ArtAccess VSA Workshops for K-12 Children with Special Needs

Art workshop for children with special needs, led by a certified occupational therapist and artists in a creative and caring atmosphere.  This is a drop-in workshop but your reservation is appreciated.  Contact ArtHeals@uoregon.edu or 541-346-6410 with questions or to reserve your spot.  This VSA program is provided in 2016-2017 under a contract with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

ArtAccess VSA Workshops for K-12 Children with Special Needs

Art workshop for children with special needs, led by a certified occupational therapist and artists in a creative and caring atmosphere.  This is a drop-in workshop but your reservation is appreciated.  Contact ArtHeals@uoregon.edu or 541-346-6410 with questions or to reserve your spot.  This VSA program is provided in 2016-2017 under a contract with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

ArtAccess VSA Workshops for K-12 Children with Special Needs

Art workshop for children with special needs, led by a certified occupational therapist and artists in a creative and caring atmosphere.  This is a drop-in workshop but your reservation is appreciated.  Contact ArtHeals@uoregon.edu or 541-346-6410 with questions or to reserve your spot.  This VSA program is provided in 2016-2017 under a contract with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

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